Video clip

Video clips are short clips of video, usually part of a longer recording. The term is also more loosely used to mean any short video less than the length of a traditional television program.
With the spread of Internet global accessing (fastest Internet broadband connection TCP with accumulator cables[clarification needed] and semi-fast connection), video clips have become very popular online. By mid-2006 there were tens of millions of video clips available online, with new websites springing up focusing entirely on offering free video clips to users and many established and corporate sites adding video clip content to their websites. With the spread of broadband Internet access, video clips have become very popular online. Whereas most of this content is non-exclusive and available on competing sites, some companies produce all their own videos and do not rely on the work of outside companies or amateurs.
A detailed icon for video e.g. to link to video content on a website
While some video clips are taken from established media sources, community or individual produced clips are becoming more common. Some individuals host their created works on vlogs, which are video blogs. The use of Internet video is growing very fast. Between March and July 2006, YouTube grew from 30 to 100 million views of videos per day. More recent developments includes the BBC's iPlayer, which was released for open beta testing in July 2007.
Online video advertising is used by advertisers. With online entertainment sites delivering high-quality television programming content free of charge, online video entertainment is rising in popularity.
With consumer attention came advertisers. MAGNA estimated that online video advertisement spending will approach nearly US$700 million in 2008, a 32% increase from 2008. As businesses seek to tighten budgetary allocations, online video is a highly measurable and results-driven delivery platform.
Citizen journalism video reporting dates back as early as the development of camcorders, but all videos were screened by the local media outlets of the time, until its spread has been aided by free upload websites in which censorship is limited to make a vast amount of videos available to anyone who wants it. Scenes rarely broadcast on television, and many first-witnessed scenes have since become publicly available.
Notably, in December 2004, tourist videos of the Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami offered worldwide audiences the first scenes of the disaster. In December 2003, videos in Hong Kong showing the bully in De La Salle School outraged the public and raised a wide concern on school violence that led to the arrest of 11 students.